Living life through immortal words

"Thigh gaps.
Flat stomachs.
Curvy hips.
Long hair.
Protruding collar bones.
Large boobs.
I am expectations.
I am standards.
I am not enough.
I am Society’s daughter.
From the day we emerge from the womb, we are raised not by our parents, but by the media.
From the day we emerge into the world that will show us no mercy, we are nothing but the slaves of society, ready to be whipped and tortured into the perfection we will never reach.
It is with horror that I say that I fell victim to this insanity. I let myself bow down to the communism of looks, the Hitler of femininity, the evil of societal standards.
I let myself be ruled by men who will never understand what it is like to be a woman.
I let myself stand in the shower, caressing myself with the claws of desperation, painting myself with the hues of my blood, pain, tears, anger, envy, longing, desire, depression, self-loathing, hatred, drawing over the temple that is my body with fingertips that seek nothing but answers to the burning curiosity rooted within me: Am I good enough?
I have asked myself countless times: Am I good enough? Pretty enough? Bold enough? Sexy enough?
But I know better now.
So when I have a daughter, when I have a child who is crying to me about not being skinny enough, mature enough, pretty enough, sexy enough to be deemed fuckable by the men of our society, the same men who do not know her, her smile, the sparkle in her eyes when she laughs, the redness of her skin when she cries, her favorite animal, her middle name, her, and know nothing of her but the size of her breasts, I will speak to her.
I will tell her the truth. I will tell her the secret of surviving in this society.
I will tell her that she is worth more than strange men who would or would not want to paint her body with their claws.
I will tell her she is worth more than the color of her hair. I will tell her she is worth more than that short dress that doesn’t make her ass look perfect.
I will tell her she is worth more than that Sephora gift card. I will tell her she is worth more than a double zero. I will tell her that she is worth more than a 34C.
I will tell her she is worth more than the goddamn credentials that prove that a girl is suitable to be fucked.
That she is enough.
That she is not standards.
That she is not expectations.
And I, mark my words, I will fucking tell her that she is more than large boobs.
Protruding collar bones
Long hair.
Curvy hips.
Flat stomachs.
Thigh gaps.
I will raise her as my own goddamn child, not as Society’s daughter."
Society’s Daughter; lydiasariel {i had this on my old blog, but i accidentally deleted, so reposting} (via lydiasariel)

(via insecure-daisy)

— 15 hours ago with 107 notes

sarajxne:

that shitty feeling when you wanna go out & be social, but once you’re out, all you wanna do is be back at home

(Source: sarajxne, via v-uch)

— 2 days ago with 302610 notes
purple-v-e-l-v-e-t:

Want a screen shot of your blog on my blog and randomly be chosen as blog of the week? If so send an ask saying “Screen Shot” - to incarcerous

purple-v-e-l-v-e-t:

Want a screen shot of your blog on my blog and randomly be chosen as blog of the week? If so send an ask saying “Screen Shot” - to incarcerous

(Source: Flickr / eichi17)

— 4 days ago with 27963 notes
naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

(via phantomhiveslut)

— 4 days ago with 25210 notes